​​The Jewish Families of Ostropol
 Researching  Jewish Families in the territories of the Russian Empire and in the small Ukrainian town of Ostropol

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Jews from Lyubar, Polonnoye, and other nearby towns in Con scription Records and Birth Registers






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​​Ostropol Jewish Voters  in  Volhynian Gazette for 1906 and 1907
by Deborah Glassman, copyright 2018

Some of this material first appeared in Voters Lists of Ostropol and Lyubar 1906, 1907, and 1912 by Deborah G. Glassman copyright 2018. Similar material, tailored to the Jews of Lyubar,  was shared with the Lyubar kehilla site and I thank Ellen Kowitt for publishing it there.


The lists published in the Volhynian gazette (the province-wide newspaper of record for Volhynia guberniya, mandated by the Russian government) were for the years 1906 and 1907 for  residents in a  group of communities designated as volosts (that is they all had dependent villages). The types of communities that were volosts, were either a mestcheko (town with dependent villages), or a grod (city over a designated size, also with dependent villages). The voters in the  lists I surveyed, were designated under the following headings: Russians, Poles, Jews, Germans. Other areas had other groups including Tatars, and the Rom. Some of the lists of 1907 were separated into different enumerations for Jews and Christians. Jews were well represented in most of the lists, only obviously excluded  in lists titled Peasants or Noble land owners. Each was being registered to vote  as Russian subjects for the 1905-enabled legislative body called the State Duma of the Russian Empire.

The first elections were held March 1906 with the vote fully counted in April. The Duma was in session for less than three months before it was dissolved. In 1907 it was re-established twice. The short-session had elections in February 1907 and that Duma was dissolved in June 1907. The November 1907 elections put in place a Duma that remained in office for five years. It was ended in June of 1912 and followed  with new elections in Sept  1912.  So, March 1906, Feb 1907, Nov 1907, and Sept 1912, were the dates that the Jews were registered in their communities. The 1912 list does not include the names of the communities but you can deduce the towns based on their inclusion of the 1906 and 1907 names in the same order. You will see the 1912 List, separately on this website in an upcoming posting.

The main grod of Novogrod-Volinski district was Novogrod-Volinski city. The only mestchekos of the area reported in the particular pages used for the Voter Lists that I compiled  were: Polonnoye, Koretz, Gorodnitza, Lyubar, Berezdov, Romanov, Ostropol, Baranovka, Miropol.  In the two 1907 lists, they were repeated in the same order  in alphabetical (Russian alphabet) order so all of the As from the grod of Novogrod-Volinski and then all of the surnames starting with A from Polonnoye, Koretz, et al. Some letters of the alphabet were broken down further.  In 1906, they did the names alphabetically and the towns were all mixed together in no particular order. In 1907, they did all of one town that started with that letter who were eligible by property, then all of the next towns with the same qualifications. Then back to the first  town with those who were eligible by trade, repeat for the other towns. Each category of eligibility had a separate run. 1907 had two separate registrations and most people who had been registered in the first group were not re-registered in the second. 1912 did not list the towns but continued the listings in the same order as previously, so you can see groups of associated names from each town. The presence of someone in one year’s list or absence in another might be because,

*** The individual has passed his 24th year and is now eligible to vote.
*** The individual has obtained sufficient taxable property or purchased other rights and is now eligible to vote.
*** The individual has retired from the position that generated his income and no longer has taxable income. He is now ineligible to vote.
** The voter has left the area – emigrated from the country, or reestablished residence in another Russian town. He would be removed from the voter lists.

I have not seen notations in the newspaper-published lists, but town registers of voters lists (not yet seen for Ostropol and Lyubar), i.e. those for Kiev, on examination, show new arrivals also. They include people who have changed the voting place to their legal residence and have taxable property in the new registration area.

The numbers in column one of the table below are just to help you keep a tally as you go down the list. They are not in the original lists. 1907 does have specific voter numbers, but they are not included in this table. Some of the people are noted as 1 of 3 or similar annotations. For example, when you look at a listing like it says 1 of 3. There are  three  listings for a  a person with that same given name and surname,  with three different fathers.  Nevertheless, two of them might still be for the same person. Sometimes a father is called by a nickname like Alter or Zeidel and in the next year’s registration by his real name. Sometimes a father is called by the first of two given names and sometimes by the second. You can determine all of that, by looking at more records for that individual, but I don’t try to make that decision here. 

There were 101 listings for individuals listed as Ostropol voters in 1906 and 1907.

Double given names are easy to separate in some formats from a patronym. That is not always the case in these listings. It is not easy to see if the name is Yankel Moshe-Leybovich or Yankel-Moshe Leybovich.  I have elected to not include notes about double names in this set of listings. 

Almost all of the individuals are listed with their father’s name. Of the 101 names, twenty-three are not noted with a patronym. 

All of the 1906 listings always have a tax status also. So the original listing will tell you whether the person was taxed “for trade hereditary” which means that he or an ancestor purchased a hereditary taxable status of Guild Merchant. Or it will tell you that he was taxed for property, for an apartment, or for trade. All of those last three statuses were commonly found when the person had the tax status of meshane (townsman). It is just more specific and can direct us to new records of property ownership or residential address. You will get that information from me, when you order a complete  extract of this voter's information, and I will include the   image of the original reference to that person.


Sequence. The original  list is not in strict alphabetical order. The original lists were conveying meaning by grouping people. Many of the voter lists reflected tax lists, which in turn put people in the same sequence in which they had appeared in Revision Lists. All of that is impacted by the publication of the Voters List in the Volinski Vedemosti of the lists by the first letter of the surname. So I will also share what I have learned from the sequence in which your party has appeared, when you make a purchase of the information on a particular voter in the list.

You can purchase a copy of the complete eBook or you can pay for individuals at 14.00 per listed voter.  The eBook is packaged in a combination purchase with the 1834 Revision List of Ostropol, for just fifty dollars.  The individual voter purchase is just  14.00 USD per voter. This gives you a full description with full given names for voter and their father, including a search for tax status, and if there are two years listing for the same person, one purchase gets you  both years. I will also indicate to you if there is a likely sibling in the list.













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Digital Access to the people named in the accompanying images:

A repetition of the same name with no annotated numeral, means they were recorded in different years. If the numeral 2 appears, it means they appear to have different patronyms. 
  
AGRIS, Leyzer
AINGORN, Zeidel 
AINGORN, Zeidel
 
BELFER, Leyba
BELFER, Srul
BERELNYA, Berko
BIALI, Shlama
BIALI, Zelman
BLANK, Gershko
BLANK, Mordko
 BLIMAN, Srul
 BRAVERMAN, Srul
 BUNTZIS, Yos

DEMB, Yos
DOLIN, Moshko
DZUBA, Berko

FLIKOP, Moshko
FRIDMAN, Yankel

GEKHBERG, Alter
GEKHENBERG Khaim
GENYUK, Leyba Itzko
GILBERG, Srul
GILIK, Shaya
GILMAN, Gertzel
GILMAN, Getzel
 GILMAN, Yudka
GINFELD [is error for Grinfeld],  Sender
GLADSHTEIN, Moshko
GLADSHTEIN, Moshko
GLATSHTEIN, Ikhil
GLATSTEIN, Ikhil
GOLDMAN, Avrum
GOLDSHTEIN, Nus
GOLDSTEIN, Einakh
GOLIK, Yos-Leyb
GOLTZMAN, Khaim-Eizer
GOLTZMAN, Yudko
GRINFELD, Duvid Shlomo
GRINFELD, Sender
GRINFELD, Zelman
GULER, Srul

KAPLAN, Nakhman
KAPLIN, Berko
KHARITON, Berko
KLEIMAN, Leibish
KLIGERMAN, Shlema
KLUBOK, Yankel Aron
KNIZHNIK, Srul
KOTELIANSKI, Shlema
KOTELIANSKI, Shlioma
KRIKOVITZ, Peisakh
KRIMER, Moshko

LAPIDA, Pinkhas
LEIFER, Leizer
LEIFER, Zelik
LIBERCHUK, Yankel
LISAK, Avram Leyb
LISAK, Kelman
LISSY, Kiva
LIVNER, Srul

MARDER, Gershko
MARDER, Gershko
MEISHENZON, Kiva Avrum

NUKHIMZON, Shlioma
NUKHIMZON, Volko

PAKMAN, Mordko
PERLMUTER, Ovsheya
PILTCH, Nusin
PILVERMAN, Shmul
PODZHAR, Gersh
PODZHAR, Moshko
PODZHARNI, Gershko
POLISHUK, Itzik Meer
 
RABENKI, Zeida
RAKHMAN, Leyb
REKHTMAN, Zelman
ROIZENBERG, Aron
ROIZENSTEIN, Srul

SHAFER, Ovshey
SHALITA, Motel
SHATZ, Avrum
SHEINBERG [ZHEINBERG], Khaim
SHERBARG, Itzko
SHMUTER, Fishel
SHTEINBERG, Yos
SHULMANOVICH, Mordko
SHUSTER, Mordko
SHUSTER, Srul
SVICHARNY. Avrum Moshko

CHERNOMORSKI, Itzko (2)
TCHERNOMORSKI, Itzko  (2)
TCHORNY, Nukhim
TEITELBAUM,  Gershon

VEKSEL, Mekhel
VEKSLER, Volf
VEKSLER, Volko
VEKSMAN, Berko
VIDMAN, Yankel

ZALTZMAN, Aizik
ZALTZMAN, Shlomo
ZYMAZNIK, Yos
  

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Write to Deborah  Glassman with any questions about Ostropol  research or your family in Ostropol  or Volhynia.  I have added dozens of  new articles and new lists about the Jews of Ostropol and nearby communities. Please come back frequently to see the new additions, the new quarterly columns, and materials never before made available! You can use this form, like all of the forms on this website, to tell me what information you would like to order, or what questions or feedback you have.  
     
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